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Friday, 27 January 2012

Great Lowestoft January birding

Having the morning off from work, on a bright sunny virtually windless morning (for a change), first stop Burnt Hill Lane and 9am, I scanned the field to the west and initially i couldn't see them and then I scanned again and there they were, 4 excellent Tundra Bean Geese. Fine birds with dark brown chocolate heads, small squat short bills with orange tips and orange legs. Too far away to photograph, I just enjoyed the scope views for several minutes. I turned away for a minute and then they were gone, I scanned and checked again they had definitely gone! They must have flown as I took my eye away from the scope to text the info out, this seems to be confirmed by a single call I heard to my right (west of the field) of a Bean Goose.
Next stop was Oulton Broad at Pets corner, I met Richard S, who had seen it around the jetty by Caldecott road, I eventually drove around there and duly saw the redhead Goosander which was initially at the jetty and then she swam quickly to the middle of the Broad (when a dog walker with a luminous jacket walked past and stopped rather perversely right in front where the Goosander was & before I could set the camera up!) and then right and out of sight again.
2 adult Egyptian Geese seen by the Boulevard and a further 2 adults and 3 immature birds by the Wherry (the only bird to pose for the camera today). A male and female Tufted Duck were reasonably close to the waters edge. A Little Grebe was seen by the "bowl" too.
At Riverside road, looking out over Lake Lothing, the excellent Black- throated Diver was seen swimming around the orange buoy whilst perched at the waters edge of a large grey ship behind the Lydia Eva, 2 Shag were seen also.
Hamilton Dock was empty and I couldn't see the Iceland from here, but my time was running out.
Next stop Ness Point where I saw 8 Purple Sandpipers mainly roosting on the northern end of the point where the sea defence rocks extend out into the sea by 20 metres, they were all asleep on the usual rock.
By the wind turbine, just past some stacked pipes a fine male Black Redstart was seen perched on a pile of wooden poles, before some visiting "birders" yelled out "Dave's got it" (they were only trying to be helpful but slightly annoying when I had already spotted it and was hoping to photograph it) which flushed the bird back to a wooden hut and it perched on a traffic cone lying on its side before darting off again.

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