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Saturday, 29 October 2016

Waxwings at Rectory Road & Dusky again

At 9.30am I eventually reached Rectory road and immediately saw 1 Waxwing perched by a Rowan/ Mountain Ash tree. I parked up opposite the junction and joined a lady who was waiting by the hedge. I spotted the bird, 2 Waxwings were perched high at the very top of a massive Oak tree one of the biggest I've ever seen, another bird flew confirming the 3rd Waxwing, so all 3 Waxwings were there. 1 bird suddenly flew down and fed on berries although it was partially obscured. After 2 minutes it flew back to the Oak tree. As we were watching the 3 perched on top, I first heard trilling, the spotted another warm brown buff Waxwing flying past and north. I looked at the tree and all 3 Waxwings were still there, so this was a 4th bird, a singleton flypast. While the birds were at the top, 1 bird was surrounded by flying wasps and this bird often kept its mouth open maybe to entice a wasp to flying! However all 3 birds flew high up several metres in vertical flight and caught wasps and fed on them when back on their perch at the top of the Oak. I include a picture of one hungrily eying up a mass of wasps! A male Blackbird flew onto the tree and fed. Then later all 3 birds flew across, 1 was out in the open but sadly its lower body was covered in shadow. Around 20 minutes later all 3 birds again flew down this time one bird was perched high up on a twig. Another fed on berries right in front of us, giving outstanding views and bathed in warm sunshine too, perfect for a bird barely 30 feet away! A Kestrel flew past calling and the birds quickly hid within the Oak. Whilst further away 2 soaring Common Buzzards seen. Finally at around 12.15pm, just as some cloud covered the sun, all 3 birds flew down again. This time 2 of their number feeding on berries right in front of us. It was really good to see Charles G from Lowestoft RSPB and Roy & Ruth H who popped off following my tweet to Rob Wil. I was famished at 12.30pm, so I reluctantly pulled myself away from the Waxwings and after a hearty much I made my way to Warren Lane Hopton, where I joined Murray & Dick (and later Cliff W). The Dusky Warbler was again was seen very high up in the tree foliage of the trees bordering the western edge of the path. It "talked" regularly and showed well with bins, but was impossible to photograph with my lens mounted to a tripod, it was far too unwieldy! It flew to the east side before eventually flying back to the west side in the tops of the trees again.

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