Sub- header

Sub- header

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Siberian Accentor and a great fall at Spurn

Spurn yesterday prob best fall I have witnessed. Birds were showy too. having left at 4am picking up Rob Will, Rob Win and Andrew E, we arrived at Easington. The fluorescent jacketed volunteers directed us admirably to a car park in the field we walked back into the village and walked up, the now fabled Vicar's Lane. As we walked up the road, a magnificent Short- eared Owl, flew way above our heads, it was apparent there was a big fall of Thrushes as around 140 Redwing seen in the field to the right bordering the Lane. By the Easington Gas terminal, we only had to queue for 15 minutes. We were then ushered forward by one of the volunteers and walked to a small line of trees to a fence looking over what looked like a back garden, the area we looked over appeared to well mossed over tarmac, the absolutely magnificent Siberian Accentor was quickly seen, feeding, it had an obvious yellow- black markings on its head. A thick black stripe area running through the eye bordered above by a cream super cilia and below by yellow lower ear coverts. The yellow on the breast extended onto the underparts. with the rest of the plumage like a Dunnock's. It flew over to a Leylandii tree, then flew up and perched within it. Just minutes later, it flew over to the moss carpeted tarmac and was frequently feeding, Dunnock like not stopping at all. Until it stopped once looked around and then hopped so close tot he fence being barely 2 metres away. later it flew back and perched on a yellow skip. Before flying down and feeding by the left hand hedge line. having to the leave, we queued again for 5 minutes before led back. The situation was repeated 10 minutes later (when we met the newly arrived Paul & Jane F) and at the end of that session we were told we could remain as no one was waiting. On the walk back, a fine brown-backed Eastern type Lesser Whitethroat seen on the edge of a tree. A Firecrest showed well briefly in some other trees., 140 Redwings & a lone Fieldfare again could be seen in the fields. We then drove over to the field near the Pub and walked back hearing a Pallas' Warbler calling in the process, only problem was we couldn't get anywhere near it! At the Pub carpark, a showy Goldcrest seen plus a male Siskin feeding on alder seeds on a tree behind us. We then went to the churchyard and overlooking to gravestones to the right in some trees we initially saw a tailless Pallas' Warbler. This was joined by first 1 then another Pallas' Warbler flitting glimpses seen as they flitted about. First the tailless one flew past and into the left stand of trees. The other 2 Pallas' warbler seen flitting around. One Pallas' kept returning to a moss covered branch. The broad yellow super cilia and yellow rump seen clearly in flight. Walking down a ride bordering the shoreline, where we saw a somewhat bedraggled but confiding Redstart on the rocks. First a Dusky Warbler showed well, "takking" as it was seen in really close bushes and the edge of reeds and we followed it down as it moved down. Back at the pub, for a drink, I heard and saw 5 Tree Sparrows flying over. We walked down the ridge again and first a Jack Snipe flew left and then a Woodcock flew right. Nearing Spurn Point a Black Redstart seen in an enclosed area, near a Heligoland trap (complete with 4 Robins trapped within) , whilst amazingly a flock of 14 Yellowhammers flying down to Spurn Point itself. Robins were literally everywhere we must have seen over 100 during the day. A ringer was processing a Robin recently plucked from a mist netwalking around we saw some Meadow Pipits, a tame Goldcrest in a tiny bush plus a mystery Acro warbler which flew into a narrow strand of reeds bordering a field. It turned out to be a Reed Warbler, We could see a vast throng of birders assembled in a long line appeared to be staring into a hedge, we later found out from Dave W it was a Radde's! We walked along the cliff overlooking the beach and near another pub car park a small grassy area bordering the beach sported a very confiding Shore Lark, initially before it disappeared into the longer grass. Walking around to the group of people, they were looking into the base of the bush west of the road, a Warbler sitting at the base showed a cream super cilia and was the Radde's Warbler, unfortunately my birding companions had split up. But as I waled around the ridge by some reeds, the excellent Radde's Warbler flew out of an area of bushed calling "quip Quip quip" and it dived into a small bush at the end. Unfortunately it was disturbed from here as birders were standing right by it and hadn't even noticed the bird fly in! Some "takking" by the reeds just left of us revealed the same Dusky Warbler showing rally well it even flew into bushes and a stem of grass just 2 metres away! It flew right while incredibly another Dusky Warbler was seen by the reed edge to the left.

No comments: